3D Printing In Seconds? Are You Kidding?

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According to this 3D Printing Video, we can use laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin. This is what the researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, along with collaborators at UC Berkeley, the University of Rochester, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have discovered. The researchers learned that they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing.

The “volumetric” 3D printing process creates parts by overlapping three laser beams that define an object’s geometry from three different directions, creating a 3D image suspended in the vat of resin. The laser light, which is at a higher intensity where the beams intersect, is kept on for about 10 seconds, enough time to cure the object.

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3D Printing In Seconds? Are You Kidding?

\

According to this 3D Printing Video, we can use laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin. This is what the researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, along with collaborators at UC Berkeley, the University of Rochester, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have discovered. The researchers learned that they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing.

The “volumetric” 3D printing process creates parts by overlapping three laser beams that define an object’s geometry from three different directions, creating a 3D image suspended in the vat of resin. The laser light, which is at a higher intensity where the beams intersect, is kept on for about 10 seconds, enough time to cure the object.

Apstra AOS 2.0 for Custom Telemetry Applications

At ONUG Fall 2017, Apstra was invited to present an AOS™ Proof of Concept.  With just 10 minutes to present, we were invited to show off the major new developments in our 2.0 release that enable custom telemetry functions and visualizations.  I could talk about this stuff for hours, but was time-challenged to select just a few of the customer use cases that would be most relevant to the leaders of the open networking revolution.

AOS has at its heart a highly scalable datastore that can ingest a tremendous amount of state information and maintain the contextual value of each element.  Couple this with a flexible GraphQL schema, and you can inspect both the desired state and the current operating conditions.  There is virtually no delay in this process, so asking simple or complex questions about the entire network becomes trivial.

This is an amazing development in the world of IT, but the question now becomes how do customers want to use these capabilities?  Do you know of a certain condition that exists in your environment that causes application issues?  How many commands does it take for you to identify this issue?  All of your expert knowledge about these events can be crafted into simple bits of code that can be run within AOS continuously.  Got a best practice that you want to run everywhere?  That takes only a few minutes to write, and then you are guaranteed that the network will always contain this search intent.  You can even build your own remediation methods or simply alert the NOC or operators that a rule has been violated.

Please take 10 minutes to watch the video and then consider this question:

If you had these powers, what would YOU do to improve the state of your business operations?

 

Bobby’s Holiday Film “The Nativity Bodyguard Statue”

“The Nativity Bodyguard Statue,” is on track to become the highest grossing “anti-vandalism” Nativity scene Holiday Film in-motion-picture history!

Bobby’s Holiday Film. “The Nativity Bodyguard Statue.” aka “Does my concealed weapon make me look FAT!”

In a rare action film starring role. Bobby Kosser plays The Nativity Bodyguard Statue.

Valued at just under $1B. This is the most ancient Nativity Scene by 1 year.*per 3001 B.C.

Bobby shines in his bodyguard statue scene as he tries to take the vandal out of vandalism.

Instead, young pranksters shoot him with a stun gun. Teens steal 10 chickens & kidnap the wisest wise men.

They even spray paint sunglasses on Bobby’s face! It’s in the police report!

Reviewers said “Bobby’s through the roof lack of range, is a perfect fit as the Nativity Bodyguard Statue.”

The film’s best line is when Bobby asks “Does my concealed weapon make me look fat!!”

Mitigating Network Outages Caused by Human Error

A recurring theme we hear from our customers is how they want to reduce the kind of errors that come with manually configuring their networks using the device CLI.  From one device to the next, every command entered represents a potential outage.  Indeed, upwards of 80% of network outages are caused by changes made at the device level via the CLI.  The Apstra Operating System (AOS™) can help reduce change-related outages by semantically validating changes before they are committed to the network.  

A Confession

Like many network engineers, I have been the cause of large scale outages.  Even outages that made the newspaper.  If there’s one thing I have learned over the years, it’s that networks are fragile.  Worse, the devices that we use to build networks are also fragile.  It’s no secret that the network operating systems (NOS) that drive these devices are usually riddled with bugs.  If you want to see a network engineer get sweaty, just tell him or her to upgrade the NOS in the network.  Finding a stable NOS that supports your needs can be a stressful, outage inducing event.  

Bugs aside, as network engineers we have to keep an awful lot of stuff in our head in order to successfully execute a change.  We have mental models of how the network is now, how the network will be, and any intermediate phases in between.  If our models are flawed in any way, or we just make a typo, we could cause an outage.

Personally, I’ve gotten to the point where there are only two possible outcomes when I press the enter key:  (1) The network works is as expected or (2) The network explodes.  Even though I know there are states in between, I have been well seasoned to expect the worst as my right pinky finger descends upon the enter key.  It’s almost as if it has an evil mind all it’s own, just waiting for the right time to strike.  

AOS to the rescue!

AOS is an intent-based distributed operating system. With AOS, your network is modeled from a reference design.  This design has rules against which changes in the network can be validated before they are committed.

The reference design requires specific features from the various NOS’s that run on network devices.  During development, AOS is tested against various NOS releases to validate that the network will remain stable and operate as expected across the engineering lifecycle.

Lastly, AOS supports Role-Based Access-Control (RBAC) for the various activities it supports. From network design to operations, you can control the way users interact with AOS.  Contrast this with the blanket “enable” or “configure” mode that most organizations default to on the device CLI, giving unlimited access to the engineers making changes to those devices.

Take the Next Step

There’s no question that the future of network implementation and operations will gravitate away from device-level CLI and the risk that comes with it.  Engineers will interface with the network at a higher, more intuitive level to achieve the outcomes that match their intent.  Apstra is leading the way on this journey.  

To start your own journey, reach out to us today and schedule a demo so you can see for yourself what intent-based networking can do to help network engineers make better, more informed decisions in their day-to-day operations.  

Click the related links to learn more about Apstra and AOS!

 

Mitigating Network Outages Caused by Human Error

A recurring theme we hear from our customers is how they want to reduce the kind of errors that come with manually configuring their networks using the device CLI.  From one device to the next, every command entered represents a potential outage.  Indeed, upwards of 80% of network outages are caused by changes made at the device level via the CLI.  The Apstra Operating System (AOS™) can help reduce change-related outages by semantically validating changes before they are committed to the network.  

A Confession

Like many network engineers, I have been the cause of large scale outages.  Even outages that made the newspaper.  If there’s one thing I have learned over the years, it’s that networks are fragile.  Worse, the devices that we use to build networks are also fragile.  It’s no secret that the network operating systems (NOS) that drive these devices are usually riddled with bugs.  If you want to see a network engineer get sweaty, just tell him or her to upgrade the NOS in the network.  Finding a stable NOS that supports your needs can be a stressful, outage inducing event.  

Bugs aside, as network engineers we have to keep an awful lot of stuff in our head in order to successfully execute a change.  We have mental models of how the network is now, how the network will be, and any intermediate phases in between.  If our models are flawed in any way, or we just make a typo, we could cause an outage.

Personally, I’ve gotten to the point where there are only two possible outcomes when I press the enter key:  (1) The network works is as expected or (2) The network explodes.  Even though I know there are states in between, I have been well seasoned to expect the worst as my right pinky finger descends upon the enter key.  It’s almost as if it has an evil mind all it’s own, just waiting for the right time to strike.  

AOS to the rescue!

AOS is an intent-based distributed operating system. With AOS, your network is modeled from a reference design.  This design has rules against which changes in the network can be validated before they are committed.

The reference design requires specific features from the various NOS’s that run on network devices.  During development, AOS is tested against various NOS releases to validate that the network will remain stable and operate as expected across the engineering lifecycle.

Lastly, AOS supports Role-Based Access-Control (RBAC) for the various activities it supports. From network design to operations, you can control the way users interact with AOS.  Contrast this with the blanket “enable” or “configure” mode that most organizations default to on the device CLI, giving unlimited access to the engineers making changes to those devices.

Take the Next Step

There’s no question that the future of network implementation and operations will gravitate away from device-level CLI and the risk that comes with it.  Engineers will interface with the network at a higher, more intuitive level to achieve the outcomes that match their intent.  Apstra is leading the way on this journey.  

To start your own journey, reach out to us today and schedule a demo so you can see for yourself what intent-based networking can do to help network engineers make better, more informed decisions in their day-to-day operations.  

Click the related links to learn more about Apstra and AOS!